Chevy’s New Impala Will Start At $27,535

A little more if you want the really good stuff, of course.

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After nearly a decade of being stuck on a car only worthy of rental or cop car duty, the Impala nameplate is coming back to glory next year on the 2014 Chevrolet Impala. Sleek, big, and packed with features, the new Impala looks like it’ll once again deserve to sit atop Chevy’s sedan lineup (at least until the V8-powered RWD SS sedan drops).

Chevy’s given us a look at the new Impala, and given us a rundown on the car’s features and specs, but they’ve just now let us know how much green we’ll have to pony up for the new Chevy four-door. The first cars onto showroom floors will be powered by the money engine, the 305 horsepower 3.6 liter V6; the cheapest V6 is the LT model, which starts at $30,760, while the fancier LTZ starts at $36,580. If you don’t need that much power, the 195 hp 2.5 liter four-cylinder starts at $27,535 for the entry-level LS model, $29,785 for the mid-grade LT, and $34,555 for the premium LTZ. Considering there’s only a $1000-$2000 price gap between the four- and six-cylinder models, we say go V6 or go home.

While the latest Impala shares a name with the Donks, Boxes and Bubbles of old, as a car designed for the mid-twentyteens, it comes packed with a lot more tech than those old whips did. Among the standard and optional highlights: radar-guided cruise control that can slow the car all the way to a stop and then bring it back up to speed, automatic emergency braking, blind spot-detecting radar, active noise cancellation, and an eight-inch touch screen with Chevrolet’s MyLink infotainment tech. Not a bad spread of goodies for a Chevy, huh? [Shout-out to General Motors!]


  • Afi Keita James

    This car is smooth.