2012 Chevrolet Camaro ZL1 Clone: Justice Served

Miami’s newest crew, Justice League, serves the competition a healthy dose of coupe command.

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Story: Evan “Evo” Yates

Photography: Andrew Link

For those who listen to country music, rap is rap; there is no distinction between coasts, styles or genres. To them, there is no backpack, no crunk, no hyphy—just rap. And for those outside the big-rim world, they begrudgingly lump together all rides rockin’ a plus-size fitment, no matter the dimensions. This unfortunate but obvious confusion is just one of the game’s demons, which Justice League Car Club of Miami hopes to rectify.

Although the members of Justice League began as friends before anything, they came together in an official capacity in January 2012, vowing to bring back some respect to the Miami new-school whip game. “We started out with about five or six cars,” says the club’s treasurer, Caddrick. “I had a Camaro and Dee had a Challenger. We collectively decided to have two-door vehicles and no bigger than 26-inch rims.” A rim-size limitation is virtually unheard of, especially in a game that thrives on the bigger-is-better mentality, but it definitely puts more emphasis on overall quality. “We felt like certain cars didn’t deserve that image,” explains club president Dietrich aka Trick. “Just because you put 30s or 32s on it doesn’t make it look good. The car wasn’t built for that—it’s hideous.” The crew admits their super-size counterparts may get the initial attention, but it’s short-lived and based on shock and awe. “We went to the 99 Jamz Car Show, and the Camaros on 30s and 32s got attention. But when we pulled up, the crowd left those cars and came over to us,” says Trick. “To us, that just reinforced that you don’t have to have 30s or 32s.”

And even though the crew has a maximum wheel size of 26 inches, they do, however, have one exception in the ZL1 (clone) that sits on 28s. “He’s our friend before anything, so he’s definitely a part of the crew,” says Caddrick. “And he stays in Broward County, where bigger is better. The car originally had 28-inch spinners, so he couldn’t downgrade because it was already set up for 28s, but he isn’t going any bigger.” In addition to wheel size, other limitations were set forth as well, conforming to what Justice League feels the standard should be in Miami. “We were riding cars with graffiti and spinners back in 2006, but we don’t ride like that anymore,” says Caddrick. “We’re like trendsetters because we evolved from that,” adds Trick.

In addition to their stringent modification requirements, Justice League also shares a common, admirable attribute that’s definitely worth noting: “We all have a positive mind-set and have jobs or businesses and are doing things legitimately,” proclaims Caddrick. “We want to show that it doesn’t take illegal money to have a nice car or a nice car club.” He continues, “People automatically assume that if a person has a certain type of car, they’re drug dealers or they participate in some type of illegal activities. But that’s not us.”

Trick adds, “That’s another reason why we won’t let just anyone in—because, at the end of the day, we all got families and we don’t want people to judge us the wrong way. That’s how we ended up with the name ‘Justice League’; we’re all like superheroes in a way, and we all came together legitimately and positively.”

Spec The Technique:

Owner: S.M.

Year/Make/Model: 2012 Chevrolet Camaro ZL1 clone

Performance: 6.2-liter V8 supercharged; performance chip

Exterior: Pearl green with black and carbon-fiber trim; custom hood scoop

Interior: Custom black leather with suede and green trim

Ice: Pioneer double-DIN head unit; three 10-inch Kicker subwoofers

Wheels/Tires: 28-inch Forgiato Rasoio wheels, 28×9 front, 28×11.5 rear; Arista A-04i tires, 275/25/28