2011 Chevrolet Camaro SS

This 'Maro casts a long shadow in the city by the bay.

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Story: Evan “Evo” Yates

Photography: David Yates

It’s been a year since the first Camaro on 30s hit the boulevard (and the cover of RIDES March/April 2011), and since then, a division of sorts has been created in the 24-inch-and-up custom Camaro game between the Stunters and the Showpieces. Until now, each side has always left enough room for the counter contingent to claim street supremacy. The Stunter Camaros would always have the biggest rims, the most fiberglass and the loudest paint, but they’d typically be base, six-cylinder models. The Showpieces would have the widebody, the V8 and the staggered multipiece wheels, but the Stunters could still go to sleep knowing that they at least had the larger rolling gear. To the untrained eye (a.k.a. someone who doesn’t read RIDES), these two vehicles are cut from the same cloth. But most notice the stark difference between them and, more important, the car owners’ intentions. So what if someone copped the most expensive Camaro on the lot—a fully loaded, six-speed SS convertible—and turned it into a Stunter?

Sticking to Stunter spec, the interior is completely revamped in a flood of fiberglass but is still as tasteful as possible, acknowledging the amount of electronics crammed into the interior. The vibrant ’vert was blessed by the Florida-famous Mad Mark’s Stereo in Bradenton, which has been creating automotive works of art since the early ’90s. Mad Mark’s scrapped the impractical rear seating and transformed it into an instrument in the rolling orchestra. In addition to the fiberglass framework, motorization is what really crowns this canary Camaro king. The Mad Mark’s crew managed to motorize two 22-inch LCD screens from the rear deck area while maintaining full function of the convertible top, which, given the allowable space, seems virtually impossible. And if the mobile cinema isn’t the crown jewel of this stunning six-speed, Mad Mark’s managed to completely reconstruct the dash and give it a feature we have yet to see in any custom ride. At first glance, the dash looks like another hunk of yellow fiberglass, but with the flip of a switch, the entire upper dash rises up to unveil the custom digital gauges and additional LCD monitors. Check the numerous YouTube clips to see for yourself. On top of the shoes and fiberglass, 941 Customs sprayed a sweet Outrageous Yellow paint that, although hard to detect in pictures, shows hints of green and other pearls in the Tampa sun.

Dom at North Tampa Customs hooked up the copious Camaro with unique shoes that clearly fit the motif of the ride, shocking everyone in passing. Dom and his crew mounted a set of 30-inch DUB Azzmacka Skirtz on skinny tires, lifting and cutting the car just enough while maintaining a factory ride. “It rides better than stock, and it could even be put back to stock if needed,” explains Dom. “Some shops claim full U-turns when their cars can barely turn, but this car does real U-turns!”

Spec The Technique:

Performance: Factory 6.2-liter V8

Interior: Custom Outrageous Yellow with green striping by 941 Customs

Exterior: Two-tone leather and suede; green with yellow trim convertible top by Classic Interiors

Ice: Full fiberglass and audio; 12 EV 10-inch subwoofers; 8 Beyma 8s; 14 Selenium tweeters; two 12-inch MMATS Dreadnaut subwoofers, one 3000.1 amplifier; four JL Audio HD 750/1 amplifiers, one XD 600/6 amplifier; Clarion EQS756 head unit; Kicker KX3 crossover; two 22-inch and two 10-inch LCD screens; three Optima YellowTop batteries; all installation by Mad Mark’s

Wheels/Tires: 30-inch DUB Azzmacka Skirtz; TRI-ACE 275/25/30 tires


  • Edgar

    This camaro is really ugly , the rims are too big and the car does not have a widebody. Please put quality custom work on your wesite like Topo from Ts designs and his widebody camaros.